Railway Street Survey

Consultation has concluded

Railway Street is a key pedestrian gateway in the Liverpool city centre. It is one of the main pedestrian entrances into the city centre from Liverpool train station, providing a convenient link to other key streets such as George Street, Macquarie Street and Northumberland Street.

Liverpool City Council is undertaking a project to make Railway Street and Railway Serviceway more pedestrian friendly. This could be achieved through slowing down vehicular traffic, improving footpaths, adding elements such as seating, more trees and planters, and providing opportunities for events. Council will implement these changes to the streetscape in order to transform Railway Street and Railway Serviceway into a more user-friendly and pedestrian-centred street, while retaining vehicle access.

Council has produced two design options and is asking community members which one they prefer.


Option 1: The Chicane


Retaining the existing lane directions, the chicane is used as a speed-calming device to change vehicular movement on the street, slowing traffic and improving pedestrian safety.

Key features of this option include:

  • Two-way street – one lane each way
  • Kerb extensions
  • Pedestrian paving
  • Additional space for school meet-and-greet
  • Relocate raised pedestrian crossing
  • Customised seating and street furniture
  • New street trees and low planting edges
  • 10 parking spaces
  • Railway Serviceway is a shared zone
  • Catenary lights in the serviceway

Click on the images below to see a hi-res concept image




Option 2: The Slow Street


Between the entry and exit points of Railway Serviceway is a central one-way east bound lane. Retaining two-way intersections at both George and Bigge Street, slowing vehicular movement within the street.

Key features of this option include:

  • A central one-way, east bound lane.
  • Two-way intersections at both ends of the street
  • Kerb extensions
  • Pedestrian paving
  • Additional space for school meet-and-greet
  • Relocate raised pedestrian crossing
  • Customised seating and street furniture
  • New street trees and low planting edges
  • 22 parking spaces
  • Paved treatment to serviceway to indicate slow speed environment
  • Catenary lights in the serviceway


Railway Street is a key pedestrian gateway in the Liverpool city centre. It is one of the main pedestrian entrances into the city centre from Liverpool train station, providing a convenient link to other key streets such as George Street, Macquarie Street and Northumberland Street.

Liverpool City Council is undertaking a project to make Railway Street and Railway Serviceway more pedestrian friendly. This could be achieved through slowing down vehicular traffic, improving footpaths, adding elements such as seating, more trees and planters, and providing opportunities for events. Council will implement these changes to the streetscape in order to transform Railway Street and Railway Serviceway into a more user-friendly and pedestrian-centred street, while retaining vehicle access.

Council has produced two design options and is asking community members which one they prefer.


Option 1: The Chicane


Retaining the existing lane directions, the chicane is used as a speed-calming device to change vehicular movement on the street, slowing traffic and improving pedestrian safety.

Key features of this option include:

  • Two-way street – one lane each way
  • Kerb extensions
  • Pedestrian paving
  • Additional space for school meet-and-greet
  • Relocate raised pedestrian crossing
  • Customised seating and street furniture
  • New street trees and low planting edges
  • 10 parking spaces
  • Railway Serviceway is a shared zone
  • Catenary lights in the serviceway

Click on the images below to see a hi-res concept image




Option 2: The Slow Street


Between the entry and exit points of Railway Serviceway is a central one-way east bound lane. Retaining two-way intersections at both George and Bigge Street, slowing vehicular movement within the street.

Key features of this option include:

  • A central one-way, east bound lane.
  • Two-way intersections at both ends of the street
  • Kerb extensions
  • Pedestrian paving
  • Additional space for school meet-and-greet
  • Relocate raised pedestrian crossing
  • Customised seating and street furniture
  • New street trees and low planting edges
  • 22 parking spaces
  • Paved treatment to serviceway to indicate slow speed environment
  • Catenary lights in the serviceway


  • CLOSED: This survey has concluded.



    Consultation has concluded